Contraception

Birth Control  The first suggestion of contraception is found in Aristotleís Historia Animalium in which he recommends covering the cervix with a mixture of the oils of cedar and olive. Violent body movements by women after intercourse as a method of preventing conception was mentioned by Greek and Roman medical men, including Galen(129–200). During Egyptian times, around 1800 BC, pessaries made of crocodile dung, vaginal irrigation with honey and sponges soaked in gum were used to prevent pregnancy. Various herbal abortifacients, such as jugri from molasses and leadwort, were also used by in India. Dioscorides in the 2nd century described several methods of contraception, including magical prescriptions or amulets, potions, pessaries and the local application of contraceptive materials. The most scientific treatise on contraception during the Roman period was written by Soranus of Ephesusin the 1st century. He specialized in gynecology and distinguished abortifacients and contraceptives. Aetius of Amida, around the 6th century, described pessaries in his encyclopedic work on medicine. Contraceptive recipes are described in the Chinese medical texts written by Sun Ssu-Mo, in AD 695. Condoms were introduced into Europe during the 17th century, supposedly by a Colonel Cundum. They were made of the dried gut of the sheep. Practical birth control in England was introduced by Francis Place (1771ñ1854) who wrote a treatise in 1822, Illustrations and Proofs of the Principles of Population. He and his assistants organized distribution of handbills on birth control in London and across the north of England in 1823. His disciples included Richard Carlile, Richard Hassel and William Campion. The economic, medical and social aspects of birth control were discussed by Carlile in Every Womanís Book or What is Love, published in 1826. Other forms of contraception using vaginal metal caps and diaphragms were used during this period. The birth control movement in America was initiated by Robert Dale Owen (1801ñ1877) in 1828. He published the first book on birth control in America in 1830, Moral Physiology in which he recommended coitus interruptus. A physician from New York, Charles Knowlton (1800ñ1850), advocated douching in Fruits of Philosophy, published anonymously in 1832. The douche and vaginal sponges were advocated by a physician, George Drysdale in his treatise Elements of Social Science published in 1854. Charles Brandlaugh, Annie Bessant and Edward Truelove were prosecuted in England on grounds of obscenity because of their attempts to promote public education on contraception during the years 1878 and 1879. A scientific forum for birth control was created in England by Sir Clifford Allibut (1836–1925) and William Bateson (1861–1926) in 1912. In the same year Sir James Barr, President of the British Medical Association, endorsed birth control, and he was joined by Abraham Jacobi (1830ñ1919), the first President of the American Medical Association. A year later the Malthusian League printed a pamphlet with advice on birth control and distributed it on a large scale free of charge. See condoms, contraceptive devices, coitus interruptus, coitus reservatus, Sanger, Margaret.



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Oral Contraception in Perspective, Thirty years of Experience with the Pill, A D G Gunn, 1987 First Edition, Illustrated
Oral Contraception in Perspective, Thirty years of Experience with the Pill, A D G Gunn, 1987 First Edition, Illustrated
£48.88
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A Practical Guide to Birth Control 1950, Sexual liberation in the 1950s
A Practical Guide to Birth Control 1950, Sexual liberation in the 1950s
£95.00
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Contraception; Its Theory, History And Practice. by Marie Carmichael Stopes, 480 pages, 1927,  good copy, scarce,
Contraception; Its Theory, History And Practice. by Marie Carmichael Stopes, 480 pages, 1927, good copy, scarce,
£98.00
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An Illustrated History of Contraception, William H Robertson, Parthenon Publishing, 1990
An Illustrated History of Contraception, William H Robertson, Parthenon Publishing, 1990
£128.00
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Contraception: Its Theory, History and Practice, Marie Stopes, G.P.Putnam's Sons 1932 New & Enlarged Edition
Contraception: Its Theory, History and Practice, Marie Stopes, G.P.Putnam's Sons 1932 New & Enlarged Edition
£138.00
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Medical History of contraception Himes, Norman E., George Allen & Unwin Ltd, London, 1936 First Edition very good copy
Medical History of contraception Himes, Norman E., George Allen & Unwin Ltd, London, 1936 First Edition very good copy
£138.00
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Radiant Mother Hood, Marie Stopes, G.P. Putnam's and Sons, First Edition, 1920. Hardcover
Radiant Mother Hood, Marie Stopes, G.P. Putnam's and Sons, First Edition, 1920. Hardcover
£149.00
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Contraception (Birth Control): Its Theory, History and Practice, A Manual for Medical and Legal Professions, Marie Stopes, John Bale Sons and Danielsson London 1926 First Edition
Contraception (Birth Control): Its Theory, History and Practice, A Manual for Medical and Legal Professions, Marie Stopes, John Bale Sons and Danielsson London 1926 First Edition
£188.00
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