Diabetes

Diabetes [Greek: dia, through + bainein, to go] The urine of diabetics was noted to attract insects, because of its sugar content, by ancient Brahmins and they named it honey urine. Around AD 100 Aretaeus gave the name 'diabetes' to the wasting disease. In On the Causes and Symptoms of Chronic Diseases, he gave a vivid description of the thirst, polyuria and dehydration that occurred. The symptoms of thirst and production of sweet urine were also observed by a Chinese physician, Chen Chuan in AD 643. The sweetness of urine was also observed by Thomas Willis (1621–1675) in 1674. In 1683, Johann Conrad Brunner (1653-1727) demonstrated the occurrence of polyuria and thirst in dogs following the excision of their pancreas. The sweetness of urine was shown to be due to a sugar by Matthew Dobson (1730ñ1784) of Yorkshire who was a physician of Liverpool Infirmary in 1775, and the sugar in the urine was shown to be glucose by Eugene Chevreul (1786-1889) of Paris in 1815. The relationship between fibrosis of the pancreas and diabetes mellitus was pointed out by John Bright in the mid-19th century. The first systematic experiments which showed that pancreatectomy led to diabetes mellitus were conducted by Joseph von Mering (1849–1908) and Oskar Minkowski (1858–1931) in 1889. Eugene Lindsay Opie (1873-1971) suggested that the antidiabetic substance was present in the islets of Langerhans in 1903. Two years later, John Rennie and Thomas Fraser of Aberdeen obtained this active substance from fish. In 1908 a research chemist in Berlin, Ludwig Zuelzer (1870–1949),  treated some comatosed diabetic patients effectively with an extract of pancreas and the long search for an antidiabetic substance ended with the discovery of insulin by Sir Frederick Grant Banting (1841-1941) and Charles Herbert Best (1899–1978) in 1922. See insulin, glycosuria. 



Sort Order :

The Discovery of Insulin, Michael Bliss, First English Edition 1987 very good copy
The Discovery of Insulin, Michael Bliss, First English Edition 1987 very good copy
£48.00
View Detail
The Living Body by Herbert Best and Burke Taylor, Hard Cover Best, Charles Herbert; Taylor, Norman Burke, 1944
The Living Body by Herbert Best and Burke Taylor, Hard Cover Best, Charles Herbert; Taylor, Norman Burke, 1944
£110.00
View Detail
The History of Clinical Endocrinology, 551 pages, Illustrated, Victor Cornelius Medvi, Parthenon Publishing, 1992 First Edition, Illustrated
The History of Clinical Endocrinology, 551 pages, Illustrated, Victor Cornelius Medvi, Parthenon Publishing, 1992 First Edition, Illustrated
£128.00
View Detail
Text-Book Of Physiology. Volume First, Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Schafer, 1036 pages, illustrated, First Edition, 1898,
Text-Book Of Physiology. Volume First, Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Schafer, 1036 pages, illustrated, First Edition, 1898,
£156.00
View Detail
Affections Parasyphilitiques , (Parasyphilitic disorders), Alfred Fournier, First Edition, 1894  Paris, good copy
Affections Parasyphilitiques , (Parasyphilitic disorders), Alfred Fournier, First Edition, 1894 Paris, good copy
£188.00
View Detail
A Treatise on Food and Dietetics, F.W. Pavy, Second Edition, J & A Churchill. 1875
A Treatise on Food and Dietetics, F.W. Pavy, Second Edition, J & A Churchill. 1875
£225.00
View Detail
ARETAEI CAPODOCISMEDICI LIB. VIII, RVFFI EPHESII de hominis partib.li.iii, velum pig skin, Paris 1554
ARETAEI CAPODOCISMEDICI LIB. VIII, RVFFI EPHESII de hominis partib.li.iii, velum pig skin, Paris 1554
£970.00
View Detail