Hypnotism, Mesmerism

HYPNOTISM [Greek: hypnos, sleep] The ancients were aware that snakes could be hypnotized with sound and fowls were also susceptible. This phenomenon was revived by Hehl, a Jesuit from Vienna in 1774. His friend, Franz Anton Mesmer (1734–1815) demonstrated the art of hypnosis in Vienna in 1776, and called it animal magnetism in the belief that the hypnosis was due to an effect similar to that of a magnet. John Elliotson (1791–1868), a professor of surgery at the University of London, revived and promoted mesmerism but, due to the opposition from his peers, he had to resign in order to promote its practice. James Braid (1795–1860), a Manchester surgeon, rediscovered the hypnotic phenomena and came to be regarded as the initiator of the scientific study of animal magnetism. Braid substituted the word ‘hypnotism’ for mesmerism. Hypnosis was used as a form of therapy by the French neurologist, Jean Charcot (1825–1893) in 1885 and Sigmund Freud (1856–1939) learned the method from him. Josef Breuer (1842–1925), a contemporary of Freud, was the first to employ the phenomenon in psychiatry. In his initial interviews with a patient Anna O (pseudonym) he used hypnosis to bring out her experiences which coincided with her symptoms. He called this method ‘talking cure’ and Freud conceived his idea of psychoanalysis from this method.



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Hypnotism, Magnetism, Mesmerism Suggestive Therapeutics and Magnetic Healing by L.W. de Laurence 1916 First Edition
Hypnotism, Magnetism, Mesmerism Suggestive Therapeutics and Magnetic Healing by L.W. de Laurence 1916 First Edition
£59.00
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Hypnotism, Its Theory, History and Practice, J Milne Bramwell Publication Date: 1921 Very Good Copy
Hypnotism, Its Theory, History and Practice, J Milne Bramwell Publication Date: 1921 Very Good Copy
£125.00
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Human Physiology, George Elliotson,Longmans, Orme, Brown, and Longmans, London 1840
Human Physiology, George Elliotson,Longmans, Orme, Brown, and Longmans, London 1840
£210.00
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