Immunology

IMMUNOLOGY [Latin: imunis, free + logos, discourse] The branch of biomedicine concerned with the response of an organism to antigenic challenge. The origins have been attributed to both the Greeks and Chinese.  Edward Jenner (1749–1823) and his introduction of smallpox vaccination  must be the earliest accredited milestone.  While Louis Pasteur’s (1822–1895) work on the anthrax bacillus showing that it could be attenuated so as to confer immunity without producing the disease was the beginning of the rise of microbiology. The theories of cellular (Pasteur’s followers) and humoral (Robert Koch’s followers) immunity constituted a period of debate in the latter years of the nineteenth century. Russian zoologist Elie Metchnikoff (1845–1916)  was a supporter of the cellular theory and in 1884 he proposed a new theory of the protective influence of inflammation.. In 1890  Emil Behring (1854–1917) andShibasaburo Kitasato (1852–1931) demonstrated the first successful clinical use of diphtheria antitoxin and proposed the word ‘alexin’ for the substance which was later renamed ‘complement’. Behring’s work was further advanced in 1895 by Nobel Prize winner, Jules Jean Baptiste Vincent Bordet (1870–1961) of Belgium, and Octave Genou (1875–1959) who discovered the complement fixation (Bordet ‘alexin’) test and showed that antibody–antigen reactions could be measured. The chemical interaction between cells, antibodies and antigens and quantitation of toxin were deduced by Paul Ehrlich (1854–1915). He and Metchnikoff shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1908 for their contributions to immunity and serum therapy. The bactericidal properties of noncellular blood were demonstrated by an American scientist, George Henry Falkiner Nuttall (1962–1937) while he was working towards his PhD at Göttingen in 1888. The first example of experimental induction of autoimmune disease was given by Thomas M. Riversand Francis F. Schwentker of the Rockefeller Institute in 1940. They produced autoimmune encephalitis in animals by injecting the animal’s own brain tissue. The concept of autoimmune disease was put forward by Ernest Witebsky(1901–1969) from Germany who emigrated to America in 1934 and proposed the Postulate of Autoimmune Diseases   around 1942. The first large study of chemical specificity in immunology The Specificity of Serological Reactions   was published by Karl Landsteiner (1868–1943)in 1936. Hemolytic anemia was one of the first autoimmune diseases to be observed in humans by William Dameshek (1900–1969)in 1940. See  immunoglobulins, histocompatibility.



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Immunology in medical practice, Geoffrey Taylor, First Edition 1975
Immunology in medical practice, Geoffrey Taylor, First Edition 1975
£48.00
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Viruses and Man, Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet,Pelican Book, 1953 Illustrated First Edition
Viruses and Man, Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet,Pelican Book, 1953 Illustrated First Edition
£97.00
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The Polynuclear Count, the nucleus of the Neutrophil. Polymorphonucler Leukocyte in Health and Disease, W T Cooke 1927
The Polynuclear Count, the nucleus of the Neutrophil. Polymorphonucler Leukocyte in Health and Disease, W T Cooke 1927
£98.00
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Recent Advances in Materia Medica, Joshua Harold Burn (1892-1981),  J A Churchill 1932 First Edition very good copy
Recent Advances in Materia Medica, Joshua Harold Burn (1892-1981), J A Churchill 1932 First Edition very good copy
£98.00
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ALLERGY: STRANGEST OF ALL MALADIES VAUGHAN, WARREN T 1942
ALLERGY: STRANGEST OF ALL MALADIES VAUGHAN, WARREN T 1942
£99.00
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The Specificity of Serological Reactions, Karl Landsteiner, Baillerie Tindall, 1936 First Edition, very good copy
The Specificity of Serological Reactions, Karl Landsteiner, Baillerie Tindall, 1936 First Edition, very good copy
£245.00
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