Nursing
NURSING IN AMERICA Elizabeth Bayley Seton (1774–1821) at Emittsburg, Maryland founded the Sisters of Charity in 1809 to provide nursing care for the poor. The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth was established in 1812 in Louisville. The Irish Sisters of Mercy arrived in America in 1846. Until 1860 no training existed for nurses in America. Rebecca Taylor, head nurse at the Massachusetts General Hospital for 34 years, was one of the finest examples of dedication to nursing before formal training was instituted. The first American medical graduate, Elizabeth Blackwell, pioneered training in America by sending volunteers to Bellevue Hospital around 1859. Dorothea Dixwas appointed as superintendent during the Civil War. Clara Barton, known as the Angel of the Battlefield, is considered as an American Nightingale of the Civil War. A Polish–German immigrant doctor, Maria Elizabeth Zakrzewska (1829–1902), trained nurses at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in 1860. Her assistant, Susan Dimock, who visited the Kaiserwerth Institute in Germany, began a one-year graded course for the nurses in 1872. The first trained nurse in America was Linda Richards, a graduate of this program and she became the first nurse in charge of the Boston Training School for Nurses at Massachusetts General Hospital, in 1873. The training school at Bellevue preceded the Boston School by a few months and that at New Haven Hospital opened later in the same year (1873). The American Nurses Association was established by incorporating the Associated Alumnae of the nurses of Bellevue, Illinois and Johns Hopkins, in 1911. The American Journal of Nursingwas published in 1900 and the  first textbook New Haven Manual of Nursing was published in 1879. The first training school in a hospital for the mentally ill was established at the  McLean Hospital in Boston in 1882.

NURSING [Middle English: norture, nurse] The Irish Sisters of Charity, founded by Mother Mary Aikenhead from Dublin in 1815, was the first to reorganize hospital nursing in the English-speaking countries. During the early 19th century almost all nurses were recruited from the domestic servant class. Working conditions were appalling and nurses often had to sleep in wards and cook their own meals. Nursing sisters were from a higher social class and matron’s duties were mostly of an administrative nature. Reform of the profession began in the latter half of the 19th century with the introduction of training. The Institute of Kaiserswerth near Düsseldorf, where Florence Nightingale spent three months in 1851, played an important role in this. The Institute was established in 1833 by Pastor Theodor Fliedner as a home for female ex-convicts and later came to include a hospital, lunatic asylum, orphanage and school. Organized training in England commenced at St John’s House in 1848, under the supervision of clergymen. Pupil nurses attended King’s College from 1856. The Nursing School at St Thomas’ Hospital was founded by Florence Nightingale in 1860. A rapid expansion of paid professional nursing staff occurred after 1866 and the first professional association, the British Nurses Association, was founded by Ethel Gorden Manson (1857–1947), matron at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in 1886. The College of Nursing was proposed in 1916 by Arthur Stanley chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society. The pioneer of nursing in Australia was Elizabeth Kenny (1886–1952) who started nursing in the bush and later established clinics providing physical therapy to polio victims in several parts of the world.



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Home Nursing, St. John Ambulance, Illustrated, 1918 First Edition, good copy
Home Nursing, St. John Ambulance, Illustrated, 1918 First Edition, good copy
£88.00
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The Life of Florence Nightingale, Tooley, Sarah, Original 1 st Edition 1905, very good copy,
The Life of Florence Nightingale, Tooley, Sarah, Original 1 st Edition 1905, very good copy,
£210.00
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